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March 9th 2018

Ireland’s next clash

When Pope Francis visits Ireland this August, he will find a nation changed beyond recognition since Pope John Paul II visited in 1979…

Less law, more shame

Theresa May – and her entire government – has promised to introduce a law against “upskirting”, after a Private Members’ Bill seeking to criminalise the offence last week failed…

Crossing boundaries

The Vatican cricket team has unveiled the schedule for its English tour this summer…

Where next for secularism?

In nation after nation, a global culture war is being fought on the same battle lines: citizen against cosmopolitan, populist against expert, democrat against judge…

England’s Valhalla

The most extraordinary things in the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Galleries are the galleries themselves…
Challenge or comfort? That might well capture the question at the heart of the pastoral care of youth…
This is an edited version of an article first published in the Catholic Herald on July 7, 1989 Having only got within ring-kissing distance of Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre the day before, I was totally unaware, upon being ushered into a darkened audience chamber at his headquarters at Écône, Switzerland, of what my promised half-hour interview with the now famous traditionalist prelate held in store…

Diary: by Alex Polizzi

Last Thursday I went to Amsterdam by Eurostar to the Van Gogh Museum…

Nick Thomas: The new anathema

English language drama is a bit thin on the ground here in Amsterdam, though there is clearly a demand for it, because Orange Theatre’s production of Martin McDonagh’s heart-wrenchingly horrible comedy The Pillowman last month was a deserving sell-out…
Arguably Mexico’s most famous artist, Frida Kahlo is known for the blunt honesty of her self-portraits, her trademark monobrow and the more-than-a-hint of a moustache…
Few stage directors these days can resist the temptation to teach us all a lesson about the subjugation of women; and Netia Jones’s new Magic Flute at Garsington goes for it with a vengeance, seizing on the idea of the opera’s masonic community as a male preserve from which women are excluded…
Nemesis: Alcibiades and the Fall of Athens by David Stuttard, Harvard, 276pp, £23.95 Alcibiades had it all: the heartthrob looks, the agile mind and the loftiest of family ties…
The Work I Did by Brunhilde Pomsel, Bloomsbury, 240pp £16.99 The value of this memoir, written from interview recordings made in 2013 by the author, then aged 102, is that it shows, both by what it says and by what it omits, what it was like to be an ordinary young German woman in Berlin during the War…
Hitler’s Collaborators by Philip Morgan, OUP, 366pp, £20 History is read backwards, but lived forwards…
Catholic Modern by James Chappel, Harvard, 352pp, £25 On the first page of this book, James Chappel states that the Catholic Church has “embraced modernity”…
As every Italian schoolchild knows, The Divine Comedy opens in a supernatural “dark wood” just before sunrise on Good Friday, 1300…
Anyone who has ever watched a fire knows that at some point the flames subside and disappear into smouldering coals which themselves eventually cool and turn into cold, grey ash…